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DC MINX imprint announced

November 25th, 2006 (09:46 am)

Character design CLUBBING

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/11/25/arts/design/25minx.html?_r=1&oref=slogin

I guess I can finally talk about CLUBBING, an OGN written by me, drawn by Josh Howard, Volume 1
out in 2007. I'll be at the Birmingham Comic Con (UK)in December to talk it up.
I first came up with the idea for the series in 2002, pitched it in 2003, a long crazy journey
ensued and it'll finally be out next year.

Comments

(Deleted comment)
Posted by: andiwatson (andiwatson)
Posted at: November 26th, 2006 10:18 am (UTC)

How do you know that those particular creators (several of whom
are working on multiple books/projects) were asked but were too busy/weren't interested (to be honest the page rate on a regular monthly book is better than on the MINX titles)/pitched but the project didn't fit the tone of the line???
You're making an awful lot of assumptions there.

Wouldn't it be odd to say I should be writing Superman instead of Gail Simone because superheroes are for boys and I automatically know what boys want better than Gail Simone does because I'm a man ???

In the end it's up to the editor to make a decision based on HER PERSONAL TASTE, the demands of the market,the tone of the line, and that those criteria will be paramount.

I've also pitched a couple of ideas for books after CLUBBING but they haven't been picked up yet, that's just the way it goes, the editor chooses the projects she likes best for a limited number of slots.

I'm not an apologist for the corporate culture at the Big Two or sexism within the industry but the idea that there's sexism at work here rather than the taste of individual editors is flat out weird/wrong.

(Deleted comment)
Posted by: andiwatson (andiwatson)
Posted at: November 26th, 2006 06:12 pm (UTC)

No probs, I'm not offended, hope you'll check out the books when they're released.
I did indeed write a tennis book for Marvel in the Jemas era that ended up in the bin. I wrote five or so issues and three or more were drawn before it got canned...if only I'd written a mixed-doubles
issue with Wolverine guesting.

Posted by: andiwatson (andiwatson)
Posted at: November 26th, 2006 06:13 pm (UTC)

Or even better, The Punisher!

Posted by: PROBE UNIVERSE (liviapenn)
Posted at: November 27th, 2006 05:46 am (UTC)
superman: steph's a fangirl


Wouldn't it be odd to say I should be writing Superman instead of Gail Simone because superheroes are for boys and I automatically know what boys want better than Gail Simone does because I'm a man ???

The difference between what Shaenon and jeepersjournal are saying, and your example here, is that "superheroes are for boys, therefore a boy ought to write Superman" is an untrue statement. Superheroes aren't "for boys."

But Minx comics are, apparently, meant to appeal to girls. They are being created specifically to capture a female audience, according to DC's own press releases. So it doesn't seem like a weird question to me, to ask, "Well, why aren't any girls working on them, then?" Not because only girls can write comics for girls, but it just seems odd that it's not even 50/50 males and females. Not even close.

The fact that most of the initial creators on the line are men... it's not automatically offensive, or terribly misogynist, and it's certainly not awful news that we're going to get to see a new book from you. But I don't think there's anything wrong with saying that it's *weird.* It would be like putting Jill Thompson and Andy Runton on a Marvel MAX book, you know? Um, okay, they're very talented, but can they appeal to that audience?

I'm not an apologist for the corporate culture at the Big Two or sexism within the industry but the idea that there's sexism at work here rather than the taste of individual editors is flat out weird/wrong.

I don't want to sound too accusatory here, but I think it would be useful to go back and read what shaenon and jeepersjournal actually said. Neither one of them said or implied that sexism was a factor in the choices the editors were making, (which would be an odd accusation to make, since the editors are female.) Neither one of them even said it was a *bad* choice, necessarily. Shaenon said it was weird and jeepersjournal said it was odd, and I have to agree. It *is* weird that DC couldn't find ANY female comics creators with any experience to work on the line's flagship books. (Cecil Castellucci has never worked in comics before.)

And obviously there are things going on behind the scenes that we don't know about-- people are busy with other things, etc.,-- but seriously, EVERY SINGLE female creator in the comics industry was too busy/not interested in Minx comics? DC couldn't find a single female writer or artist to work on Minx comics? They had to go out and recruit a novelist? That's not weird? It strikes me as a little weird.

(Honestly, the one thing I do fear will be an unintended result of Minx comics is that stupid DC fanboys will now be able to say things like "Well, go read Minx comics if you don't like such-and-such. Superman is for boys. You can tell because Minx comics are the special SEPARATE comics for girls." And then I'll have to kill someone.)

Posted by: andiwatson (andiwatson)
Posted at: November 27th, 2006 09:29 am (UTC)

>therefore a boy ought to write Superman" is an untrue statement. >Superheroes aren't "for boys."

I believe it's true in terms of content and marketing, the kind of ads that appear in those books, they're specifically aimed at a certain type of boy/man. Clearly anyone can read those books but I think their intent and purpose is crystal clear.

As for your other points, fair enough.

In brief, my naive/improbable/impossible hope is that my book will be judged on its own merits when its released and not used as
ammo in a wider discussion about sexism in the comics industry. That ain't gonna happen, obviously.

It's not that I don't think the argument shouldn't be had...I think my comic book work over the years speaks for itself...but I should stick to defending my creative decisions rather than DC editorial policy.

I think Jeepers and Shaenon and I made our points in polite and straightforward ways, if anyone's offended, my apologies. I want people to feel they can post without getting snapped at and Shaenon and Jeepers are welcome to post whenever they want and if they think I've been a jerk then they'll let me know, I'm sure.

As for the opinions of "stupid DC fanboys", I couldn't care less.

Posted by: PROBE UNIVERSE (liviapenn)
Posted at: November 27th, 2006 05:38 pm (UTC)

>>Superheroes aren't "for boys."

I believe it's true in terms of content and marketing, the kind of ads that appear in those books, they're specifically aimed at a certain type of boy/man. Clearly anyone can read those books but I think their intent and purpose is crystal clear.


DC and Marvel may be dumb enough to be *purposely* shunning half their potential market, but that doesn't mean that *superheroes* are for boys. Half the shojo manga Tokyopop and Viz are putting out there are about some kind of superhero. Most female comics fans I know adore superheroes. We would *love* to read more books about superheroes if only we didn't have to deal with being treated like second-class citizens who are oh-so-generously being "allowed" to read those books-- as long as we shut up about the quasi-porn cheesecake and pervasive misogyny.

Minx seems like it's going more for a pre-teen chick-lit feel, and maybe there's a place in the market for that, but if *I* was trying to catch a piece of the Toykopop market, I'd start working on some books about dragons, ninjas, pirates and magical girl adventure. Because girls *love* superheroes.

In brief, my naive/improbable/impossible hope is that my book will be judged on its own merits when its released and not used as
ammo in a wider discussion about sexism in the comics industry. That ain't gonna happen, obviously.


"Ammo" is kind of a loaded word. (Pardon the pun.) Do you really think it's so unfair to judge DC on what they say and do? Is it gathering data, or "gathering ammo?" You might want to think about the fact that you frame any attempt to discuss sexism in terms of *being attacked*. Because it's pretty clear that that's how you perceive it.

I think Jeepers and Shaenon and I made our points in polite and straightforward ways

Whatever. The initial comment wasn't even about DC, it was about the weird slant in the newspaper article. Someone made a statement that wasn't any more accusatory than, "Hey, the NYT is saying this new line is by horror writers, for horror writers, but none of these writers are actually horror writers, so what's up with that?" And you freaked. Caps-lock, multiple question marks, putting accusations of sexism in people's mouths who were not accusing *anyone* of sexism, and calling them "flat-out weird/wrong" for even asking the question. That was not polite. It was not cool. And if I were you, I would take a minute and think about why I reacted like that.

Posted by: andiwatson (andiwatson)
Posted at: November 27th, 2006 05:59 pm (UTC)

>And if I were you, I would take a minute and think about why I >reacted like that.

I broke my first rule of comics: NEVER ARGUE ON THE INTERNET (especially with CAPS or punctuation!!!!????) and I have been
duly punished...patronised to death on my own blog.

Posted by: PROBE UNIVERSE (liviapenn)
Posted at: November 27th, 2006 06:10 pm (UTC)


You know what's sad? Nobody was even arguing with you when you freaked out on them. They were just *asking a question*. They weren't arguing or accusing you, or even DC, of anything. If you think it's flat out weird and wrong to ask a question that even hints at being possibly related to something that might be related to sexism, then you gotta realize: you're part of the problem.

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